500 Most Important idioms and Phrases for SSC, Banking and other exams

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Most repeated and expected idioms and phrases for ssc chsl, ssc cgl, ibps and all other competitive exams

  1. Out of wits –  Greatly confused

  2. Call spade a spade – To speak in a straightforward manner

  3. Face the music –  Accept the punishment

  4. To play second fiddle  –  Take a subordinate role

  5. Casting pearl before swine – Offering good things to undeserving people

  6. Putting the cart before the horse –  Doing things in the undeserving people

  7. Not fit to hold candle – Not s good as somebody to do something else

  8. Egg someone on – To encourage somebody to do something 

  9. For good – Permanently

  10. Achilles heel  –  Weak spot

  11. Pour cast and dogs  –  Rain heavily

  12. Above board –  Legal and honest

  13. Feel blue – In trouble / Depressed

  14. Live-wire –  A person who is lively or energetic

  15. Cool one’s heel –  To keep waiting

  16. Bury the hatchet –  Make peace

  17. Wet one’s whistle –  To have a drink / Moistens one’s throat

  18. Thick and thin –  In spite of all diffculties

  19. In apple pie order –  In perfect order

  20. A closefisted man –  A miser

  21. As draft as a brush –  Very silly

  22. Rise with the lark  – Get up early / To get out of bed very early in the morning

  23. At one’s wit’s end  –  To be so worried by a problem that you don’t know what to do next

  24. Make a beeline –  Rush/To go straight towards something as quick as you can

  25. Wild goose chase –  Useless search

  26. A man of letters –  A literary person

  27. Horse sense –  Basic common sense

  28. Shot in the arm –  Something that gives encouragement

  29. Catch time by the forelock –  Seize opportunity

  30. Teething problems –  Defficulties at the start

  31. A wild goose chase –  Fruitless pursuit

  32. To get into hot water – To get into trouble

  33. A bolt from the blue  –   A complete surprise

  34. Plain sailing  –  Very easy

  35. Take to one’s heel –   Run off

  36. To cut one short –  To criticize one

  37. Show the white flag –  To surrender

  38. A cut above –  Rather superior to

  39. To throw dust in one’s eye  –  To deceive

  40. To take after –  To resemble an older member of family

  41. Flying visit – Very short visit

  42. Telling upon –  Showing effectively / Having strong effect

  43. Kith and kin – relatives

  44. Part and parcel – Important part

  45. Beat about the bush –  Circumlocution / Does not talk specifically

  46. Carry out –  Complete something

  47. Take fancy –  To attract or please somebody

  48. Snake in the grass – A hidden enemy

  49. Make a mountain of a mole hill – Exaggerate a minor problem

  50. Big draw –  Huge attraction

  51. Bear down – To move quickly towards something / Someone in a determined or threatening way

  52. To put a spoke in someone’s wheel – Destroy the plan / Cause hindrance

  53. At a stretch –  Continuously

  54. Know beans about something –  Well informed and intelligent

  55. To get into hot water – To get into troubles

  56. Know the ropes –  Learn the procedures

  57. Rub up the wrong way – To irk or irritate someone

  58. Barking up the wrong tree – Trying to find someone any wrong place

  59. In the swim – Well informed and up-to-date

  60. Salt of the earth –  Good, honest and ideal

  61. Bring the house down –  make the audience applaud enthusiastically

  62. The Alpha and Omega –  Beginning and end

  63. Pin money  – Additional money

  64. Keep wolf away from the door –  Keep away extreme poverty

  65. Foam at the mouth – Angry

  66. Husband one’s resource –  Save/Economical

  67. Bring about –  Cause to happen

  68. Give vent to – Express

  69. Read between the lines –  Know what the writer thinks

  70. To be down to earth – To be realistic

  71. In the nick of time – Just in time

  72. To shun evil company –  To avoid or give up bad company

  73. Seamy side –  Unpleasant and immoral

  74. A sacred cow –  A person never to be criticesed

  75. A dog’s Breakfast  –  A total mess / A thing that has been done badly

  76. Sail in the same boat – To be in same situation

  77. Take the bull by the horns –  To face a difficulty courageously

  78. Shed crocodile tears –  To pretend to be sympathetic

  79. To be in a quandary – In a coonfusing situation

  80. Add fuel to the fire – Worsen the situation

  81. In the loop – Informed refularly

  82. Hold one’s horses – To keep waiting

  83. Black out – Lost consciousness

  84. Cut and dry method –  Honest

  85. Back to the drawing board –  Plan it all over again

  86. In the same page –  Thinks in a similar way

  87. Pull no punch –  Speaks frankly

  88. Going places – Talented and successful

  89. Stand by – To help/ Support somebody or be friend, even in difficult times

  90. In black and wite – In weiting

  91. At a loss –  Unable / Not knowing about what to do or say

  92. Lame exvuse –  Unsatisfactory explanation

  93. Hand in glove –  Working closely with someone / Very intimate

  94. A hard nut to crack – A difficult problem or situation to solve or deal with

  95. For better or worse –  Always

  96. From the bottom of one’s heart – To speak frankly

  97. In a nutshell –  Brief

  98. A shot in the dark –  An attempt to guess something

  99. A close shave  –  Narrow escape from danger

  100. Cool as cucumber –   Not nervous or emotional

  101. In high spirits –  Cheerful

  102. Scapegoats – A person who is blamed for the wrongdoings with arrogant reactions

  103. A red letter day – A day memorable for joyful event

  104. Wears heart on sleeves – Express feelings openly

  105. To pay off old scores – To refund old dues

  106. Man of letters –  Proficient in literary arts

  107. Turn down –  Refuse

  108. On good terms –  Agree with someone

  109. Pore over –  Go through

  110. Make both ends meet – To live a lavish life

  111. Run down – Criticise

  112. Grease anybody’s palm – To give bribe

  113. Leave in the lurch – Abandon in the midway / Difficuly situation

  114. Caught red handed – At the time of committing crime

  115. On the brink of – On the pint of

  116. Face the music – Face the unpleasant consequences

  117. Gift of the gob – Ability to speak impressively

  118. Go down the drain – Lose forever

  119. Gerrymandering way –  In a manipulative and unfair way

  120. Strain every nerve – Make all efforts / Try all tricks

  121. Hard and fast – That cannot be altered / fixed

  122. Turn up one’s nose at – To not accept something because you do not think it is good enough for you

  123. Down in the dumps – Sad and depressed

  124. Dot one’s l’s and cross one T’s – Be detailed and exact

  125. All moonshine – Superficial

  126. Wild goose chase – A foolish and useless enterprise

  127. Swan song – Last prayer (at funeral or farewell)

  128. By the skin of teeth – By the narrowest margin

  129. Add fuel to the fire – Worsen the situation

  130. In the loop – Informed regularly

  131. Hold one’s horses – To keep waiting

  132. Black out – Lost consciousness

  133. Cut and dry method – Honest

  134. Back to the drawing board – Plan it all over again

  135. In the air – Certain / Able to be firmly relied on to happen or be the case

  136. On the same page – Thinks in a similar way

  137. Pull no punch – Speaks frankly

  138. Going places – Talented and successful

  139. A close shave – Narrow escape from danger

  140. Cool as cucumber – Not nervous or emotional

  141. In high spirits – Cheerful

  142. A red letter day – A day memorable for joyful event

  143. Wears heart on sleeves – Express feelings openly

  144. To pay off old scores – To refund old dues

  145. Man of letters – Proficient in literary arts

  146. Turn down – Refuse

  147. On good terms – Agree with someone

  148. Stole the show – Win everyone’s praise

  149. Measure up – Reach the level

  150. Doctor the accounts – To manipulate the accounts

  151. Dark horse – An unexpected winner

  152. Face the music – To bear the criticism

  153. In the red – Losing money / To owe money

  154. Beat about the bush – Speak in a round about manner

  155. Bring about – Cause

  156. Pull up – Reprimand

  157. Rides the high horse – Feel superior

  158. By fits and start – Irregularly

  159. Has a bee in one’s bonnet – To be preoccupaid or obsessed something

  160. See through – Detect / To realize the truth about someone or somebody

  161. Take after –  To follow / t0 take care of older member of family

  162. Allow a free hand – Complete liberty

  163. Cut coat according to one’s cloth – Live within your means

  164. To be always one’s beck and call – At one’s disposal

  165. Turn a deaf year – Disregard / Ignore/Refuse

  166. To filght tooth and nail – To fight in a determined way for what you want

  167. Set the record straight – Give a correct account

  168. Good samaritan – Helpful person

  169. Bad blood – Angry feeling

  170. To go to the whole hog – To do it completely

  171. Lay out – Spend

  172. Break off – Suddenly stop

  173. Go haywire – Become out of control

  174. Above board – Honst / without any secret

  175. Feather in one’s cap – An Achievement

  176. Follow one’s nose – To go straight ahead

  177. To latch onto – To promote

  178. Fight shy of – To avoid someone / Something

  179. Add fuel to the fire – Worsen the matter

  180. Cock and bull story – Absurd an unbelievable story

  181. Hold water – Seem logical

  182. Balloon goes up – The situation turns unpleasant or serious

  183. Watching grass grow – Very boring

  184. Nine day’s wonder – A dazzling short-lived specacle of no real value

  185. Beyond the pale – Outside commonly accepted standards

  186. Took after – Similar to / To look or behave like an older member of your family

  187. Throw dust into one’s eye – To deceive

  188. Cool about working – Not tense about working/Raading to work

  189. Salad days – Adolescence

  190. All ears – Attentive

  191. Maiden speech – First speech

  192. An axe to grind – A private interest to serve

  193. To blow one’s own trumpet – Praise one’s own abilities and achivevements

  194. Stand-offish –   Indifferent

  195. Sowing wild oats –  Irresponsible pleasure seeking in young age

  196. A bolt from the blue – Something unexpected and unpleasant

  197. By leaps and bounds –  Rapidly

  198. Of no avail – Useless

  199. On the verge of –  On the brink of

  200. A sore point – Something which hurts

  201. Like a phoenix – With a new life / Rebirth

  202. Break the ice – Initiate a talk

  203. Keep the wolf from the door – Avoid starvation

  204. Fish in troubled water –  To make a profit out of troubled situation

  205. Look into – To investigate

  206. Smell the rat – Suspect that something is fishy

  207. Let the grass grow under the feet – Delay in getting things done

  208. Apple of discord –  Cause of animosity

  209. A fish out of water –  In uncomfortable situation

  210. In the long run –  Over a period of time

  211. Jumping down one’s throat –  To react bery angrily to somebody

  212. Fall back –  To turn or move back

  213. Turn up one’s nose at – To reject / despises

  214. Turn one’s head –  To feel proud in a way that other people find it annoying

  215. High and dry –  Neglected / To leave someone helpess

  216. Take for granted –  To accept readily / To pre-suppose as certainly true

  217. Mince matters –  To confuse issues / To mix facts

  218. Currying favour with –  Ingratiating / Trying too hard to get please somebody

  219. Set one’s face against – Oppose strongly

  220. Strom in a tea cup –  Commotion over a trivial matter

  221. Putting one’s foot down – Asserting one’s authority / Take a firm stand

  222. To play to the gallery – To behave in an exaggerated way to attract people’s attention

  223. Read between the lines – Understand the hidden meaning

  224. Sitting on the fence – Hesitating which side to take

  225. No love lost between –  Not on good terms

  226. To have not a leg to stand on –  Unable to prove or explain why something is reasonable

  227. A man in the street – An ordinary person / Common man

  228. Blood running cold –  Become very frightened

  229. Playing to the gallery – Befooling the comman man

  230. Come out of one’s shell – To appear suddenly

  231. Lay down arms –  To surrender

  232. For good –   Permanently

  233. An about turn –   Complete change of opinion or situation

  234. Make a mockery –  To make something seem ridiculous or useless

  235. Eat like a horse –  Eat a lot

  236. Go to the dogs –   To be ruined

  237. Pay on the nail –  Pay promptly / Payment without delay

  238. Penelope’s web –  An endless job

  239. At draggers drawn –  Enmity

  240. Bury the hatchet –  Make peace

  241. Null and void  –  Not binding / Having no legal force

  242. Take french leave –  Absenting oneself without permission

  243. To put in a nutshell – To state something very concisely

  244. The genomes of Zurich –  A slang term for Swiss bankers

  245. To make up one’s mind – to decide what to do

  246. To call it a day –  Decide  to finish working of the day

  247. In two minds –  To be undecided

  248. Put something by –  To save money for a particular purpose

  249. On cloud nine –  Extremely happy

  250. The jury is out –  No decision has been reached

  251. Hold water –  With logical backing  / To stand up to critical examnation

  252. Other fish to fry –  Some important work to attend to

  253. A close shave –  A narrow escape from danger

  254. To tell in a nut shell –  In a brief manner / Summarize

  255. Within a stone’s throw –   At a short distance

  256. To feather one’s nest –  To enrich oneself when opportunity occurs

  257. A close-fisted person –   A miser

  258. To gather roses only –  to seek all enjoyments of life

  259. A black sheep –   A person with bad reputation

  260. To greass the palm –  To bribe

  261. Take a leap in the dark –  To take risk

  262. Cut the guardian knot –   Remove difficulty / To solve problem

  263. Blow one’s own trumpet –  Self boasting

  264. A cakewalk –    An easy achievement

  265. Not to look a gift horse in the mouth –  Not to find fault with the gift received

  266. Man of straw –  A man of no substance

  267. Born with a silver spoon  –  Born in a rich family

  268. Let sleeping dogs lie –  Not to bring up an old controversial issue

  269. A month of Sundays –  A long time

  270. A closed book –  A mystery

  271. Big draw –  Huge attraction

  272. Bear down –  To move quickly towards something / someone in a determined or threatening way

  273. To put a spoke in someone’s wheel –   Destroy the plan

  274. At a stretch –  Continuously

  275. Know beans about something –  Well informed and intelligent

  276. To get into hot water –  To get into troubles

  277. Know the rops –  Learn the procedures

  278. Barking up the wrong tree –  Trying to find someone ay wrong place

  279. In the swim  –  Well informed and up-to-date

  280. Rub up the wrong way – To irk or irritate someone

  281. At the eleventh hour –  At a last moment

  282. Stick to guns –  Hold on to original decisions

  283. Out of hand –  Out of control, at once, immidiately

  284. The salt of the earth –  Veryl good and honest /kind

  285. Talking through hat – Talking nonsense

  286. Looking forward to –  To expect something or someone

  287. Slip off –  Leave quietly

  288. Get on well – Have a friendly relationship

  289. In a pickle –  In an embarrassing or awkward situation

  290. Ice braking –  Starting a conversation

  291. Bad hats –  People of bad character

  292. Give and take –  Adjustment

  293. Off and on – Irregularly

  294. Man of straw –  A man of no substance

  295. Break down  –  Weep  bitterly

  296. Get down to business –   To begin work seriously

  297. Go about –  Go around / To continue to do something

  298. Take exception –  To object at something

  299. Giving a piece of one’s mind –  Speak sharply / To dispprove

  300. Hold your tongue –    To be silent

  301. No hard and fast rules –   Easy regulation

  302. Live from hand to mouth –  Miserably

  303. Turn a deaf ear –  Refuse to obey

  304. Take exception –  To object

  305. To hail from   –  To   come from

  306. To put an end to –  Stop 

  307. By fits and starts –  Irregularly

  308. Bad blood – Feeling of hatred 

  309. Iron fist –  To treat people in severe manner / strictly

  310. Time and again –  Always

  311. Eat humble pie –  To say or show that you are sorry for the mistakes  cimmitted by you

  312. Done for –  Ruined

  313. On the level –  Honest and sincere

  314. Make ducks and drakes of –  Squander

  315. Go to the winds –  Disappear

  316. Helter- skelter –  In disorderly haste

  317. By leaps and bounds –  Rapidly

  318. Herculean task –  A work requiring very great effort

  319. Got the sack –  Dismissed from

  320. To call spade a spade – To be frank

  321. A white elephant – Costly and troublesome possession, with much use to its owner

  322. To miss the bus –  To miss an opportunity

  323. To look down one’s nose –  To regard with contempt

  324. To shed crocodile tears –  to pretend grief

  325. Go scot-free –   To escape without punishment

  326. At the eleventh hour – At the last possible moment

  327. To bring to light –  To reveal

  328. To hit the jackpot –  To make money quickly

  329. To burn candle at both ends – To be extravagant/Spend without any worry

  330. Chicken out –  Withdraw

  331. To make things done –  To manage

  332. Donkey’s year –  A long time

  333. Feel one’s pulse –  To find what one is thinking on some point

  334. Take to task –  Punished / Reprimanded

  335. Have something up your sleeve –   Have an alternate plan

  336. Rule the roost –  Exercise authority / to be the most powerful member in the group

  337. Make a clean breast –  Confess

  338. To end in smoke –  To come to nothing/ no outcome

  339. To foam at one’s mouth –  To be very angry

  340. Send packing –  To tell somebody firmly or rudely to go away

  341. Kick up a row –  Make a great fuss 

  342. Wet behind the ears –  Young and without experience

  343. To talk someone over –  To convince over

  344. Wear heart on sleeves –  Express emotions freely

  345. Bury the hatchet –   To make peace 

  346. Once in a blue moon –  Rarely

  347. Through thick and thin –  Under all circumstances

  348. Come to grief –  To suffer

  349. Eat anyone’s salt –  To be anyone’s guest

  350. Give a hand with –  to help with

  351. Take to heart –  To be very upset by something that somebody says or does

  352. Had better –  Used for telling somebody what you think he ‘should’do

  353. Strike a bargain –  to negotiate  a deal 

  354. Point blank  –  very definite and direct

  355. Kicking heels –  To be relaxed and enjoy

  356. End in smoke –  Come to nothing

  357. Die in harness –  Die in service/Die while working

  358. Take cue from – To copy what someone already did in past in order to be successful

  359. Call for –  To ask

  360. Out of the question –  Undesirable / Not worth discussing

  361. Look down upon –  Hate intensely

  362. Face the music –  Get reprimanded

  363. Token strike –  Short strike held as warning

  364. Fell foul of –  Got into trouble with

  365. By fits and start –   Irregularly

  366. Enough rope –  Enough freedom for action 

  367. All at sea –  Puzzled

  368. Sweeping statement –  Thoughtless statement

  369. A shot in the dark –  An attempt to guess something

  370. In a nutshell –  Brief

  371. From the bottom of one’s heart –  To speak frankly

  372. For better or worse –  Always 

  373. A hard nut to crack –  a difficult problem or situation to solve or deal with

  374. Hand in glove  –  Working  closely with someone / very intimate

  375. Lame excuse –  Unsatisfactory explanation

  376. At a loss –  Unable / Not knowing about what to do or say

  377. In black and white –   In writing

  378. Stand by –  To help / suppoet  somebody or be friend, even in difficult times

  379. Hard nut to crack –  Difficult task

  380. Rat race –  Fierce competition for power

  381. Dropping like flies –  Collapsing in large numbers

  382. Ins and outs –  Full details

  383. Spread like fire –  Spread rapidly

  384. End up in something –  Come to nothing / Useless

  385. Run into –  To meet someone accidently

  386. Flogging a dead horse –  Wasting time in useless effort

  387. Under a cloud –  Under suspicion

  388. Turn a deaf ear –  Disobey

  389. Have the last laugh –  To be victorious at the end of an argument

  390. Red letter day –  Happy and significant day

  391. To blaze a trail –  To lead the way as a pioneer

  392. To beat a retreat – To run away in fear

  393. To steer clear of –  Avoid

  394. To get one’s own back –  To get one’s revenge

  395. To run across – To meet by chance

  396. A dark horse –  An unforeseen competitor

  397. Put up with –  Endure

  398. Put your feet down –  Take a firm stand

  399. Read between the line –  To understand the inner meaning

  400. To the letter –  Paying attention to every detail

  401. To carve out a niche –  To work harder in order to have successful career

  402. Wild goose chase – Useless search / Unprofitable adventure

  403. In dutch –  In trouble

  404. See eye to eye  –  to have the same opinion

  405. Come to light – Been revealed/To become known to people

  406. Around the clock –  Day and night

  407. Hand in glove –  In close relationship

  408. To make a mountain of a molehill  –  To give great importance to little things

  409. Hold your ground –  Refuse to yield 

  410. To speak one’s mind –  To be frank and honest

  411. Maiden speech –  First speech

  412. At the eleventh hour –  At the very last moment

  413. Cope with –  Compromise

  414. Go a long way – Help considerably

  415. Gift of the gab –  Talent of speaking

  416. Standstill – Complete halt

  417. Cross swords –  Disagree

  418. To fight tooth and nail –  To fight heroically, in very determined way

  419. Birds of some feather –  Persons of  some character

  420. Take exception –  To object over something

  421. High handed –  Using authority in an unreasonable way, overbearing

  422. Too fond of one’s own voice – To like talking without wanting to listen to other people

  423. By leaps and bounds –  Rapidly

  424. An open book –  Straight forward and honest dealings

  425. Fall short –  Fail to meet expectation

  426. Heart to heart talk –  Frank talk

  427. Give the game away –  Give out the secret

  428. To cut teeth –  To gain experience of something for the first time k

  429. Cut no ice –  Had no influence

  430. Close the book –  Stop working on something

  431. In fits and starts –  Irregularly

  432. Bird’s eye view –  An overview

  433. Run in the same groove – clash with each other

  434. Keep your head –  remain calm

  435. Fall short –  Have no effect

  436. Pull strings – Use personal influence

  437. Pot luck dinner –  Dinner where somebody brings something to eat

  438. To hit below the belt –  To attack unfairly

  439. To have something up one’s sleeve – Having a secret plan

  440. To take to one’s heel –  To run away

  441. To turn a deaf ear –  to be indifferent

  442. At snail’s pace –  To do things very slowly

  443. To run one down –  To disparage someone

  444. To blow one’s own trumpet – To praise oneself

  445. To face the music –  To bear the consequences

  446. To take someone to task –  To scold someone

  447. At one’s wit – Puzzled / Confused / Perplexed

  448. At stake – In danger

  449. Making hay while the sun shines –  Taking advantage of a favorable opportunity

  450. Blow one’s own trumpet –  To praise oneself

  451. Bear with –   Support/ To be patient with some body or something

  452. Give vent to – To emphosize

  453. Turn a deaf ear –  Pay no attention

  454. Bonee of contention –  Matter of dispute

  455. Stand on own feet –   To be independent

  456. By fits and starts –  Irregularly

  457. Over head and ears –    Completely

  458. To call it a day –  To canclude proceedings

  459. To put up with –  To tolerate

  460. To face the music –  To bear the consequences

  461. Yeoman’s service –  Social woek

  462. To take to hearts –  To grieve over

  463. To smell a rat –  To be suspicious

  464. To move heaven and earth –  To try everything possible

  465. To take someone for a ride –  To deceive someone

  466. In cold blood –  Not disappointion result

  467. To bite the dust –  To be defeated

  468. At sixes and seven –  In disordor or confusion

  469. Lose head –  Panic

  470. Take to task –  To criticize severely / To punish

  471. Sit in judgement –  To pass judgement especially when you have no authority

  472. Leave in the lurch –  To desert someone

  473. Cry over spilt milk –  Cry over irreparable losse

  474. Bad blood –  Active enmity

  475. Close shave –  A narrow escape

  476. Grease palms –  To bribe someone

  477. Carrot and stick –  Reward and punishment policy

  478. To stave off –  Postpone

  479. To give a piece of mind –  To  reprimand

  480. Rest on laurels –  To be complacent

  481. Pay through nose –  Pay an extremely high price

  482. Draw on fancy –  use imagination

  483. Turn an honest living –  Make an legitimate living

  484. Give the game away –  Give out the secret

  485. Cheek by jowl –  Very near

  486. Give in – Yield

  487. Run riot –  Act without restraint

  488. Go through fire and water –  Undergo  any risk

  489. Talking through hat –  Talking nonsense

  490. Put up with –  Tolerate

  491. By fits and starts –   Irregularly

  492. Reading between the lines –  Understanding the hidden meaning

  493. Get the sack –  Dismissed from

  494. Pros and cons –  Considering all the facts

  495. By leaps and bounds –  Very Quickly

  496. In the good books – In favour with boss

  497. In the long run – Ultimately

  498. See eye to eye – To think in same  way

  499. Put across –  To communicate your ideas, feelings, etc.

  500. To have second thoughts –     To reconsider

  501. Not my cup of tea –  Not what somebody likes or interested in

  502. To break the ice –  To start a conversation

  503. To eat a humble pie –  To say or show sorry for a  mistake that one made

  504. To add fuel to fire –  To worsen the matter

  505. To burn one’s fingers –  To get physically hurt

  506. At the eleventh hour –  At the last moment

  507. To feel like a fish out of water – uncomfortable situation

  508. Turn up – To appear

  509. Die hard –  Unwilling to change

  510. Turn down –  Reject

  511. To pass away –  Die

  512. Carry weight –  Be important / Imporatant influence

  513. Fall flat –  Fail to amuse people / Fail to produce intended effect

  514. Under the thumb of –  Under the control of

  515. To get wind – Come to know about something secret or private

  516. Part and parcel – An essential part of something

  517. To give vent to –  To express a feeling, especially anger, strongly

  518. All at sea –  Puzzled

  519. Bulld castle in the air –  Daydreaming

  520. On the spur of th moment   –  To act suddenly, without planning

 

About Important idioms and Phrases :

Top important idioms and phrases for all competitive exams are given above to make exams easy for candidates. We try here to provide most repeated idioms and phrases in ssc , ibps, banking, nda, cds exams. If you are looking for top important idioms and phrases with hindi meaning than you can put a comments below in comment section and we will update hindi meaning for these. top most important idioms and phrases pdf download will be available soon here. these are most expected idioms and phrases for upcoming exams.

Top important idioms and phrases for ssc cgl, ssc chsl, ibps exams, banking exams, upsc, pcs and for other government examinations. These phrases are important for all competitive examinations. T9schools is top web portal for all competitive examinations and for other examinations.

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